Feminist Newswire

Obama Administration and States in Contention over Transgender Rights

Last night, a federal judge in Texas blocked the Obama administration from enforcing guidelines that extended protections under Title IX to transgender students in public schools.

Afghan Women are Paving the Way for Future Athletes

This week, Afghanistan’s Kimia Yusufi competed against the best of the best in the 100-meter track heat at the 2016 Summer Olympics. She was one of three athletes, and the only woman, representing Afghanistan in Rio.

Sex Testing for Female Athletes Might Become a Thing of the Past

For the first time in over 50 years, women competing in the Olympics have not been subject to sex-testing, a shocking practice that has for years allowed sports governing organizations to police the gender and sex of women athletes, sometimes with devastating consequences.

Chicago Passes Paid Sick Leave Ordinance

Chicago has passed an ordinance requiring that all employers whose business is located within the city limits or who has licensing agreements with the city provide their employees with paid sick leave.

Baltimore Police Completely Neglected Rape Victims According to Department of Justice Report

The scathing report on the Baltimore Police Department (BPD) issued by the Department of Justice last week highlights victims of police misconduct not typically discussed: sexual assault survivors.

President Reallocates Funding in Wake of Zika Crisis

In the wake of Congress’ refusal to pass a Zika funding bill before their five-week August recess, President Obama announced last week the administration’s intent to reallocate $81 million from the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to help combat the Zika virus.

New Boko Haram Video Reignites International Concern over Reproductive Health of Rape Victims

On Sunday, Boko Haram released a video reporting the alleged status of hundreds of girls held hostage by the militant group, including the over 250 schoolgirls that were abducted in 2014.

Department of Justice Sues Mississippi for Failing to Provide Adequate Mental Health Care

The Department of Justice filed a lawsuit against the state of Mississippi for failing to provide adults with mental illness appropriate access to healthcare, a violation of their civil rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Civil Rights of Institutionalized Persons Act (CRIPA).

India’s Only Newspaper Run Entirely by Women Goes Digital

India’s only newspaper produced exclusively by women, Khabar Lahariya (New Waves), continues to break down barriers by going digital, posting video reports and instant updates on WhatsApp and Facebook.

US Policy on Abortion for Women and Girls Raped in Conflict at Odds with International Law

On the 67th anniversary of the adoption of the 1949 Geneva Conventions, a series of treaties concerning the rights and protections of noncombatants, prisoners, and those injured during armed conflict, the United States continues to overlook one of its most important protections: the right of the “wounded and sick” to non-discriminatory medical care .

Judge Rules Planned Parenthood Shooter is Still Not Competent to Stand Trial

A Colorado judge today ruled that Robert Dear, the man who has admitted to carrying out the 2015 shooting at a Colorado Springs Planned Parenthood, remains mentally incompetent to stand trial.

Feminist Leaders Marched the Olympic Torch through Brazil

The 2016 Olympic Summer Games began with the traditional parading of the torch throughout the country, including in Fortaleza, where two leaders of Brazil’s feminist movement led the march through the northeastern city.

Department of Justice Report Finds Baltimore Police Department Saturated with Civil Rights Violations

The Justice Department has issued a scathing 163-page report finding that the policies and practices of the Baltimore Police Department systematically violate the civil rights of black residents.

Canada Forms Commission to Investigate Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women

Carolyn Bennett, Canada’s Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs, announced new details concerning a highly-anticipated national inquiry into the disproportionate rate of murders and abductions of indigenous women in Canada.

Obama Shortens Sentence of 214 Federal Inmates

President Obama shortened the sentences of 214 federal inmates last week, the largest number of commutations granted on a single day in more than a hundred years.

Ibtihaj Muhammad Is the First American to Compete in the Olympics Wearing a Hijab

This summer Ibtihaj Muhammad is the first American to compete in the Olympics while sporting the hijab, a headscarf some Muslim women choose to wear.

Reproductive Health Care Providers Prevail in Spite of Anti-Abortion Protests

National anti-abortion extremist groups attempted to intimidate and harass abortion providers and patients in Cleveland, Philadelphia and Wichita this July.

We Must #SayHerName: Korryn Gaines

Korryn Gaines, a 23-year-old African American woman, was shot and killed in her home by Baltimore County police officers on Monday afternoon.

Peru Fails to Prosecute Former President for Mass Forced Sterilizations

Peru’s public prosecutor Marcelia Gutiérrez declined to prosecute former president Alberto Fujimori and his health ministers for the forced sterilization of hundreds of thousands of people in the late 1990s.

Moderate Republicans Sweep Kansas State Legislature and Senate, Ousting Conservative Incumbents

On Tuesday, moderates swept the Republican primary races in Kansas, ousting 14 conservative state legislator incumbents, and ushering another 7 moderates into open seats, a sign that many Kansans are not happy with Governor Sam Brownback’s slashes to government services.