An Afghan court convicted seven men for the gang rape and robbery of four women in Paghman district near the city of Kabul.

via MA

via MA

According to reports, a group of men – some dressed in police uniforms and carrying assault rifles – stopped a group of cars traveling in Paghman last month, pulled the women from their cars, and raped them in a nearby field. The women had been traveling with their families; one was pregnant. The men also beat the women and stole their jewelry and phones. After the attack, the women were taken to a hospital by their families. The attack was reported to police after one of victims died in the hospital.

The vicious public attack received national attention and sparked outrage among Afghan women leaders. Last week, President Hamid Karzai speaking at a women’s group event after meeting with a delegation of women about the attack, said “I am strongly against the death penalty and I have always been against it, but I have asked for the death penalty, and I asked the Chief Justice to issue a death sentence for these criminals.”

Judge Safiullah Mujadidi conducted the trial on Sunday, which was televised nation wide in Afghanistan. During the trial, the victims appeared publicly in the courtroom to identify their attackers. Another woman, allegedly raped by the men three years ago, also identified the men as her attackers.

Hundreds of Afghan women and men rallied in the streets of Kabul chanting and holding signs saying, “My sister is your sister,” “Raping women is raping the nation,” and ”We demand justice from the government.” The Afghan Women’s Network held rallies in eight cities in Afghanistan calling for “immediate justice” and showing support for the victims.

After a short trial, the court convicted all seven men on various counts related to the attack, and sentenced them to death. Human Rights Watch has expressed concern over the speed of the trial – which reportedly lasted only two hours – and possible due process violations. The men will have a chance to appeal.

The Paghman attack has brought national attention to violence against women in Afghanistan and the need for a more robust response to crimes committed against women. One activist on Sunday, told reporters, “If this act goes unpunished, the women of Afghanistan will continue to be victims. This is really a very significant moment, I would say, even maybe in the history of Karzai’s government.”

President Karzai issued the Elimination of Violence against Women Law (EVAW Law) in 2009 by executive decree. The law criminalizes 22 acts of violence against women and specifies punishment for perpetrators. The law, however, has had mixed results. While more crimes against women have been reported, overall there is still massive under-reporting of violence against women, according to a report released by United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) and the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) last year. In addition, the report found inadequate investigation of these crimes and continued lack of prosecution. 

Media Resources: Global Voices Online 9/8/14; Human Rights Watch 9/8/14; Reuters 9/7/14; Tolo News 9/7/14; Feminist Newswire 12/9/13

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