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Anthropologists Study Remains for Clue to Earhart Disappearance

Several researchers believe they may have found evidence that can be linked to the 1937 disappearance of aviator Amelia Earhart. Bones discovered in 1940 on Nikumaroro Island in the republic of Kiribati by British soldiers had previously been determined to belong to a man. However, Richard Gillespie, Director of the International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery, recently had the remains re-examined. Forensic anthropologists determined that due to the dimensions of the bones, the remains most likely belong to a white female of northern European descent, about 5 feet 7 inches tall. “We have probably the most dramatic archival and scientific evidence in 61 years to indicate that we may soon know what happened to Amelia Earhart,” Gillespie said. Several experts remain skeptical of Gillespie’s findings on Earhart, who disappeared while making an attempt to become the first woman to fly around the world.

Several researchers believe they may have found evidence that can be linked to the 1937 disappearance of aviator Amelia Earhart.

Bones discovered in 1940 on Nikumaroro Island in the republic of Kiribati by British soldiers had previously been determined to belong to a man. However, Richard Gillespie, Director of the International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery, recently had the remains re-examined.

Forensic anthropologists determined that due to the dimensions of the bones, the remains most likely belong to a white female of northern European descent, about 5 feet 7 inches tall.

“We have probably the most dramatic archival and scientific evidence in 61 years to indicate that we may soon know what happened to Amelia Earhart,” Gillespie said.

Several experts remain skeptical of Gillespie’s findings on Earhart, who disappeared while making an attempt to become the first woman to fly around the world.

Sources:

AP - December 2, 1998

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